Last Fish Week, Last Workshop: Eels with Sarah Mount

 

This past weekend R.A.R.E. spent some time with Sarah from the D.E.P. (Department of Environmental Protection) at the ArtsWestchester gallery.  She generously gave up her time to host a cool workshop on Saturday.

We participated in having our 11 inch live eel friend pose for us while Sarah talked about Hudson River eels.  A young visitor nick named our fish friend, “Slippery”.

Something new I learned about eels; though they may travel  1500 miles one way from the Sargasso Sea to their N.Y. home it turns out they are not the greatest travelers in terms of mileage compared to others.  Mainly because they like the Hudson River too much and choose to grow and live here before it’s time to make the journey back!

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The Protective Three-Spined Stickleback Dad

In spring, the local male stickleback can be seen building a nest made of twigs, plant debris and mucus.  Once complete, he flashes his bright red belly and vibrates his blue-green tail in hopes of attracting a female.  To complete the dance he presents to her his home-made nest.  If interested she may enter to lay her eggs.  This process may occur more then once with other females.  Her  role complete, she is chased out by the male who swims through the nest to fertilize the eggs.  He then stands guard, occasionally fanning the oxygen filled water with his fins.  When hatched, for the first few days of their lives, the father defends them.  He goes as far as gathering the little wanderers in his mouth and spits them back into their nursery until they are ready to be off on their own.

*sketch by Borren Hui

Todd & Laura’s Sneak Peek

Test your knowledge and guess which beautiful fish goes with which fish fact?

1.The Tautog is a popular inshore gamefish that lives along the Atlantic coast from Nova Scotia to South Carolina. Although capable of reaching relatively large sizes, they are very slow- growing

2. The American Shad is an anadromous fish, spending its adult life at sea and returning to fresh water rivers to spawn. They are primarily plankton feeders, but will eat small shrimp and fish eggs.

3. The Black Sea Bass is anadromous but does not spawn in Long Island Sound tributaries. They are popular sport fish that appear in the Sound in the summer, feeding on squid and finfish.

 

Hudson River Wildlife blooms in the science lab of Blue Mountain School

A collaborative effort between art and science took shape in Mr Bugara’s science lab at the Blue Mountain School in Croton last week. With the guidance and support of Mrs Krause and Mr Gioacchini, the talented art educators on staff; the invitation by R.A.R.E. and ArtsWestchester to build a “fish tank” of wildlife for the sculpture garden at the Arts Exchange Gallery (in White Plains) spurred a fury of recycled creativity, problem solving, team building and lots of duck tape.  Take an inside look into the high school’s process of representing the wealth of species in the estuaries that call the Hudson River and the Long Island Sound their home.

Julia’s Sneak Peek

The mural “What it’s Like to Be a Fish” (created by J.Sverchuk & E.Peña) illustrates the underwater worlds of salt water and fresh water.  It meets at the center, representing the estuary that makes up the LI sound. The window in the middle of the mural is utilized to provide daylight to the translucent section (of the mural), giving off a stain glass effect.

 

Tova Snyder’s Sneak Peek

In taking a look at the universal picture, Tova concludes that besides there being a dialog involving scientists, economists and politicians – it comes down to the individual and our individual choices which have the power, when unified with others, to avert disastrous climate change.  By using elements of fantasy and found objects within a ‘fun house’ theme, viewers walk through an installation that asks them to place themselves directly within current events and to speculate on personal decisions, while offering suggestions for individual and community action.

Eileen Stodut; Artist of the Week

My love of creation and life stem from an incident when I almost lost my own. The reawakening of my soul and the realization that we are all one has made me see how fragile and delicate the essence of life is. I believe, most people deep in their hearts, are aware of this; it is the strand that ties us all together. This oneness we have to each other and the earth and all it’s inhabitants is what I strive to communicate through my art.  My participation with Fish Tales; Around Westchester is a vehicle in which I am given the opportunity to combine my passion for art and nature.

 

Hudson River Fact of the week

Moon jellies turn the color of the food they eat.  Pink jellies eat mostly crustaceans, while orange jellies have been dining on brine shrimp.  They can be found in warm and temperate coastal waters; mainly along the estuaries during the summer months.  They are enjoyed by sea turtles, large fish and marine birds.  This brings up the major problem of plastic bags looking a lot like jellies.